London 1666

The Great Fire of London

London 1666

Out of the ashes
A new world

London 1666

London 2016

Great Fire 350

A season of events marking the Great Fire of London.

Great Fire 350 - A Season of Events

Throughout 2016, City of London institutions marked the 350th anniversary of the Great Fire of London with Great Fire 350, a season of exhibitions, concerts, lectures and tours. At the centre of this was London’s Burning. A festival of arts and ideas produced by Artichoke, who also brought Lumiere London and The Sultan's Elephant to the city. It included an underwater performance-artwork at Broadgate; a domino-like sculpture that snaked through the City’s streets tracing the multiple paths of the fire; and a spectacular fiery finale on the river Thames.

London's Burning and Artichoke received founding sponsorship from the City of London Corporation, major support from Arts Council England and the Department for Media, Culture and Sport and a host of other sponsors.

Exploring the 1666 Great Fire of London through the vision of contemporary artists, writers and thinkers.

London's Burning brought the Square Mile and surrounding area to life with a series of art installations, performances, talks and tours that gave a modern perspective on a significant moment in the country's history.

What was on at London's Burning?

Find out what was happening during the London's Burning festival.

London 1666 - a wooden interpretation of the London landscape during the Great Fire was set alight on the river Thames.

Fire Garden - set amongst the gardens of Tate Modern, this warm, glowing, living sculpture park showed just how beautiful fire can also be.

Holoscenes - performers could be seen going about their daily lives whilst submerged in a tank of water.

Dominoes - a 7km chain of breezeblocks toppled along the streets of London.

Fires of London: Fires Ancient and Fires Modern - Projections on St Paul’s Cathedral and the National Theatre celebrated the ability of people and places to overcome adversity.

Of All the People in All the World - Grains of rice were used to illustrate statistics, big and small.