Welcome to Worcester

Worcester is one of the oldest cities in the country, with evidence of settlements here dating back to 700BC. The city was fortified in Saxon times and our history can still be seen in the landscape today, from cobbled Tudor streets to elegant Queen Anne architecture. The street layout hasn’t changed since the middle ages and the city’s High Street follows the Roman thoroughfare.

Step back in time

See the remains of the Castle Walls
Wander down Friar Street with its black and white buildings and quaint cobbled streets. Discover museums and National Trust gardens and at the bottom, you’ll see Edgar Tower, the last remaining part of the Castle Walls.

The Commandery
Our role in the English Civil Role

Encounter the past brought to life in a beautiful Grade I listed building with an 800-year history. Set in the heart of historic Worcester, The Commandery is most famous for being the Royalist  Headquarters during the deciding battle of the English Civil War – the Battle of Worcester 1651.

Worcester Cathedral

Royal tombs and the Star Spangled Banner

The dramatic Worcester Cathedral rises above the city landscape along the banks of the River Severn, with magnificent views over Worcestershire from the top of the tower. Founded in 680 as a Priory, the cathedral we see today was built in 1084. The cathedral houses royal tombs; the most notorious is ‘bad’ King John, famed for signing Magna Carta over 800 years ago.

It is also the birth place of the American National Anthem. John Stafford Smith who wrote ‘The Anacreontic Song’, which became the ‘The Star-spangled Banner’ was an organist in the 18th  century for the annual Three Choirs Festival which has been held here since 1715. Visitors can join evensong here every evening and sometimes twice on Sundays.

Worcester CathedralPlan your visit
Birthplace of Sir Edward Elgar

Dedicated to the composer of Land of Hope and Glory, this humble cottage provides a glimpse of his origins and early life.