WHERE LONDON BEGAN

Founded by the Romans, this ancient city has weathered invasion, war and fire to be custodian of centuries’ old traditions, modern cultural icons, world-class restaurants, and some of the best views the capital has to offer.

AT A GLANCE

Cultural icons. Hidden gems.

Home to Europe’s largest arts centre, the Barbican, the iconic dome of St Paul’s Cathedral and the landmark towers of Tower Bridge, you can experience world-class cultural institutions whilst also uncovering hidden gems and peaceful sanctuaries for rest and reflection. Don’t miss the moving Watt Memorial to Heroic Self-Sacrifice in Postman’s Park, a poignant memorial to heroism in everyday life, or the medieval grandeur of the Guildhall Great Hall.

Take your breath away

Gaze down on skyscrapers from a garden in the sky, watch a bridge lift through the glass floors in the walkways of Tower Bridge or perhaps watch the sunset on St Paul’s Cathedral with a cocktail in hand: the City has staggeringly beautiful views that provide new perspectives on this ancient city.

One square mile

Well served by tube, train, bus and riverboat, and with a geographical footprint of one square mile, you can easily carve your own path through the City on your own two feet. For maps and information visit the City Information Centre next to St Paul’s Cathedral, for free, impartial advice from friendly, multi-lingual advisors.

Featured in the City of London

Visit St Paul’s Cathedral and climb the 257 steps into the dome of St Paul’s to discover the cathedral’s intriguing Whispering Gallery, accessible via a secret stairway. When building the Cathedral, a fun design accident occurred. If you whisper into the walls of St Paul’s dome someone positioned anywhere along that wall – even 30m away – will be able to hear you. The Grade I cathedral is one of the capital’s most recognisable sights and dates back to the late 17th Century. It was designed by Sir Christopher Wren in the English Baroque style and is dedicated to Paul the apostle. The Cathedral has played host to a variety of national events over the centuries and most recently the Thanksgiving Service for the Queen’s 90th birthday.

St Paul's CathedralPlan your visit
The CharterhousePlan your visit
Museum of LondonPlan your visit
Four Seasons HotelBook your stay
Guildhall Art GalleryPlan your visit
City Information CentrePlan your visit
Billingsgate Roman House and BathsPlan your visit
Leadenhall Market Plan your visit
The City of London

Originally, London was solely the City – or Square Mile as it has become known – and it became the capital of Roman Britain in AD100. Over the centuries, London flourished as a trading port, the rights and privileges of its citizens being well established by the time of the Norman conquest in 1066. The City of London Corporation, which governed civic life and trade, developed a model of municipal democracy which was copied by many towns and cities and the City became the most powerful and prestigious square mile in the world.

An inspiration to some of England’s most loved writers, Shakespeare, Dickens and Chaucer all worked here, and its rich heritage continues to inspire new generations of writers, filmmakers and architects.

The City is custodian of a remarkable legacy. From a Roman sports arena to one of England’s oldest public libraries, the art, treasures and curiosities gathered over the centuries are available for everyone to enjoy.